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Adventures in the Villa

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Missouri

2022-09-29 Mountanview, Arkansas

The caravan starts today!

Airstreams are arriving all day!

There will be 24 rigs in the caravan. In case you are wondering, no, we don’t travel down the road all together… Maybe two-three rigs together, maximum. Typically Lynda and I travel by ourselves.

We will be exploring northern Arkansas and southern Missouri. Our itinerary is as follows:

Mountainview, AR; Cotter, AR; Eureka Springs, AR; Bella Vista and Bentonville, AR; Branson, MO; Mountain Grove, MO; Mountain View, MO.

Never heard of some of these places? Neither have we… (In 2019, we did visit Eureka Springs, Bella Vista, and Bentonville…)

We received our “Drivers Manuals” – a three ring binder containing everything we need to know about the entire caravan.

At dinner time we trekked about 1/4 mile to “The Skillet” restaurant, part of the Ozarks Folk Center, adjacent to our RV park…

Dinner was a huge buffet of Southern food… Soup, salad, turnip greens, chicken and dumplings, fried okra, fried chicken, meat loaf, and blackberry cobbler. The soup and cobbler were good…

The Mayor of Mountainview greeted us…

After dinner we walked back to the RV park, then we met again to review the drivers manual, job assignments, and other logistical things…

We returned to the Villa, drank the wine we had forgotten to bring to dinner, and turned in early…

An enjoyable time was had by all…

2022-09-27 Traveling to Mountanview, Arkansas

We hitched up and left Eureka, MO today. We are heading out to Mountainview, AR to the rendezvous spot for the caravan.

We drove about 50 miles along the interstate, then we topped off fuel in Rolla, MO. We left the interstate and said goodbye to civilization…

This is Missouri…

We no longer saw vast field of corn; here was more general farming and lots of rolling hills…

This is Willow Springs, MO, about halfway to the border…

We moved on…

These roads are all marked 55 mph, but the entire way is all curves, uphill, and downhill. The entire way is signed as SLOW – 25 mph, 35 mph, 45 mph for the curves, so there is no way you can go 55 mph…

The Ozarks, also known as the Ozark Mountains or Ozark Plateau, is a physiographic region in the states of Missouri, Arkansas, Oklahoma and the extreme southeastern corner of Kansas. The Ozarks cover a significant portion of northern Arkansas and most of the southern half of Missouri, extending from Interstate 40 in central Arkansas to Interstate 70 in central Missouri.

There are two mountain ranges in the Ozarks: the Boston Mountains of Arkansas and the St. Francois Mountains of Missouri. Buffalo Lookout, the highest point in the Ozarks, is located in the Boston Mountains. Geologically, the area is a broad dome with the exposed core in the ancient St. Francois Mountains. The Ozarks cover nearly 47,000 square miles (120,000 km2), making it the most extensive highland region between the Appalachians and Rockies. Together with the Ouachita Mountains, the area is known as the U.S. Interior Highlands.

The Salem Plateau, named after Salem, Missouri, makes up the largest geologic area of the Ozarks. The second largest is the Springfield Plateau, named after Springfield, Missouri, nicknamed the “Queen City of the Ozarks”. On the northern Ozark border are the cities of St. Louis and Columbia, Missouri. Significant Ozark cities in Arkansas include Fayetteville, Bentonville, Springdale, Eureka Springs, and Fort Smith. Branson, just north of the Arkansas–Missouri border, is a tourist destination and popularizer of Ozark culture.

As we drove south we finally crossed over into Arkansas…

This is Arkansas – the countryside is not much different than southern Missouri…

Some fixer-upper real estate is sometimes available…

We arrived at the Ozarks RV Park in Mountainview… Three other Airstreamers were already here – these are our leaders, co-leaders, and a friend who came in early to help out…

We set up the Villa, and met our new friends; soon we all headed out together to go to dinner. At 4:30! We went to The Wing Shack and Cheeseburger Grill, one of the finer attractions in town…

And an enjoyable time was had by all…

2022-09-25 Traveling to St. Louis, MO

Short drive today, but lots to see…

It is only about a two hour drive from Springfield, IL, to St. Louis, MO.

Coming into the city and crossing the Mississippi River again we were able to see the Gateway Arch. The architect was the talented Eero Saarinen. We were able to see it up close and ride the frightening “elevator” to the top in 2017… Today we can see it in context with the rest of downtown St. Louis…

Crossing the Mississippi River…

After several detours due to a closed interchange we finally arrived at our campsite…

We quickly set up and then we were off again to see the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Kruase House in the nearby city of Kirkwood…

The Frank Lloyd Wright “Krause House”, in Ebsworth Park, was designed by Wright in 1950 at the request of Russell Kraus and his wife Ruth. Located in Kirkwood, Missouri, a suburb of St. Louis, the 1,900-square-foot house is sited in a grassy meadow beside a grove of persimmon trees. The house is an excellent example of Wright’s Usonian architecture, intended to provide middle-class Americans with beautiful design at moderate cost.

For his Usonian homes, Wright developed a “unit system” based on geometric shapes. The Kraus House is based on an equilateral parallelogram with a complex floor plan of intersecting parallelograms. Typical of Usonians, the house has an open living area, a central hearth, concrete slab floors with radiant heat, and a wall of glass doors that affords views of the landscape. The same materials are used both inside and out: brick, concrete, glass, and tidewater red cypress. The doors to the main terrace incorporate stained glass designed by Russell Kraus, a mosaic and stained glass artist.

The Krauses moved into their home in January 1956 and lived there together until Ruth’s death in 1992. In 2001 a non-profit organization, The Frank Lloyd Wright House in Ebsworth Park (FLWHEP), purchased the house and grounds from Russell and deeded the property to St. Louis County for the creation of a public park and house museum. Subsequently, the FLWHEP completed an extensive restoration of the brick, woodwork, furniture, and textiles in the home.

Today, the FLWHEP remains responsible for the preservation and operation of the house museum. The organization also serves as a focal point in the St. Louis region for educational programming on Wright’s legacy, as well as architecture and design in general. The St. Louis County Parks and Recreation Department maintains the grounds, known as Ebsworth Park. Due to a generous donation from Barney Ebsworth, the park was named in memory of his parents, Alec W. and Bernice W. Ebsworth.

The design of the house is typical of most of the “Usonian” houses we’ve seen. (The Dana-Thomas house was “Prairie Style”…) Usonian houses still maintain the horizontal lines Wright was so fond of, and, of course, outrageous cantilevers. Usonian houses are generally one story, on a slab foundation, with similar materials used inside and out.

Arriving at the house we marveled at the entrance gate, clearly denoting that something special was ahead… We passed through the gate, drove up the hill, and around the house, and entered the motor court on the backside of the house…

The Krause house is one of the more complex houses, yet also one of the simplest. There are no right angles, nor rectangular or square rooms in the house. The house is arranged over a grid of equilateral parallelograms. You can see what results from this model:

We arrived at the motor court and carport…

The motor court follows the shape of the parallelogram as it cuts into the site. The house does not sit atop the site, but cuts into it…

Walking around the house we see the cantilevers, the brick walls with the mortar joints emphsizing the horizontal, and the integration of the house into the site…

The front door is not at the “front” of the house, but is where it ought to be – in the motor court. The art glass windows were designed by Wright or by the owner, a great artist in his own right…

The interiors are all brick walls or wood board and batt walls. Most lighting is indirect and all the light fixtures and all the furniture was designed by Wright…

The telephones are custom colored as Wright’s “Cherokee Red”, as is the floor slab…

When you design a floor plan as parallelograms beds are required to be parallelograms, too…

Or a hexagon…

It was a delightful tour. It is a very exciting house…

We returned to the Villa. Happy Hours ensued; an enjoyable time was had by all…

2022-09-22 Traveling to Springfield, IL

We had another long, uneventful day, driving from Kansas City, MO, to Springfield, IL

This is Missouri…

We stopped in a parking lot to have a bite of lunch in the Airstream. And we kept rolling on…

We approached Illinois and crossed the Mighty Mississippi River…

This is Illinois…

After 6 1/2 hours we approached the RV park. If this were Arkansas or Missouri I would be listening for banjos…

We found our campsite. We are here for three days! We unhitched, leveled, put out the slide, hooked up water, power, and cable TV. We could live here!

Happy Hours ensued, then dinner. An enjoyable time was had by all…

2022-09-21 Traveling to Kansas City, MO

Another long travel day, this time through Kansas. But we did get in two tourist activities…

We pulled out of the RV park in WaKeeny beneath cloudy skies…

Soon the skies were threatening… And the rain began…

It rained for for two hours straight. Sometimes hard, sometimes not so hard, but it never stopped…

We refueled at a terrible Sinclair station. In the rain… And we were limited to about 15 gallons… So we moved on…

In Abilene, KS, we made a spontaneous, impromptu decision to stop in at the Eisenhower Presidential Museum and Library…

Dwight D. Eisenhower was born and raised, along with 5 brothers, in this little house on the “wrong side of the tracks”…

The house is undergoing a full restoration, so it was not open for tours.

We enjoyed the museum. I’m not big into military artifacts or history, but the WWII exhibits were interesting. After stints as President of Columbia University, Head of the Joint Chiefs, and his eight years as President of the US, he and Mamie retired to Gettysburg…

So we moved on… More Kansas. Quite beautiful…

We fought the tight streets in downtown Kansas City, MO, which, of course, are always under construction… (I only ran over one red pylon…). We arrived at Community Christian Church…

In 1940, Frank Lloyd Wright was commissioned to design a new church building at 46th & Main Streets in Kansas City, Missouri. Departing from tradition, Wright envisioned a “church of the future”, integrating the entire property as worship space. His design included theatre-styled seating, gallery space for social events and a radical approach to heating and cooling. Instead of a traditional steeple, Wright designed a Steeple of Light that would beam light rays from the rooftop.

​The first concept of Wright’s design was published in the Kansas City Star on July 13, 1940. The building dedication was held on January 4, 1942.

​Community Christian Church was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2020 in recognition of its unique and outstanding architectural design.

Personally, this is the least typical Wright building I have seen. Many signature features, such is woodwork, windows, and details are not present here. But it is an interesting space, and well worth the visit…

The roof is basically flat, but this perforated dome sits atop. The “Light Cannons” that provide the “Steeple of Light” are inside this dome…

The walls are an interesting innovation: They are 2″ x 2″ steel tubes, at about 24″ spacing. Attached to the tubes is wire, then building paper, then about 3/4″ of gunnite; gunnite is an inexpensive spray-on application of concrete… These photos show walls that did not receive the gunnite, so we can see the tubes, wires, and paper…

There is a full projection booth at the balcony level. In the early days the church showed first-run Hollywood movies…

The tiny chapel is not by Wright, but it is fairly compatible…

One of the old light cannons…

It was a lovely tour, lead by two “church ladies”. We concluded the tour on the exterior balcony that overlooks the Park across the street…

I was able to find this photo on the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation website, showing the “Steeple of Light”…

After the tour we walked across the street to the park; we noticed this guy; maybe he’s looking for Hollywood and Highland…

Across the street was a lovely restaurant… Happy Hours on ordered…

We had one more short drive to the campground for tonight… Over a wacky bridge… Called the Christopher S. Bond Bridge, it is a cable-stayed bridge, 316′ tall…

We parked at a lovely RV park…

And an enjoyable time was had by all…

2022-09-18 Traveling Green River, Utah

After an uneventful night we headed out. From Arizona, back into Nevada, then up the 15 into Utah…

Utah has magnificent geological formations. We took a few photos, but we are on a tight schedule, so we did not stop often or spend too much time being touristy…

We stopped in a little town called Hurricane, UT, to stretch our legs again…
These next photos are the amazing mountains all through Utah…
We soon headed east on the 70. More great mountains!

We continued East…

We arrived in Green River, Utah, and checked into the RV park. It was still hot…

We had been to Green River before, in 2018, on the Southwest Adventure Caravan. We had arrived from the south, and we spent hours at the Historic Museum telling the story of John Wesley Powell. Powell left from here on the Green River, which joins the Colorado River a few miles south of here. He continued on and explored the Colorado through the Grand Canyon…

We are not heading south – we did that in 2018. Tomorrow we continue East. We will drive over the Rocky Mountains, continue through Colorado, Kansas, and into Missouri. In Kansas City we will tour a Frank Lloyd Wright building. We continue east through Missouri and into Illinois to Springfield, where we will see more Frank Lloyd Wright, and all things Abraham Lincoln. Finally we will head south to meet up with the caravan in northern Arkansas…

And an enjoyable time was had by all…

2021-08-09 & 10 – The Oregon Trail caravan … Days 12 and 13 – Evansville and Casper, WY

Short stories today. I woke up Monday with a sore throat; Lynda has had a cold since Saturday. We stayed in all day…

We did manage to get outside and walk a bit around the RV park, but it is constantly hot and dusty and windy…

We were feeling well enough to get out about 4:00 and join the club at a very good steak house nearby. After a few Old Fashioneds at the bar, and an appetizer of steak tartare, we joined the others for prime rib and cheesecake…

We returned to the Villa and turned in early…

Tuesday we felt a bit better (or at least Lynda did…) We headed out at 10:00 am to see the National Historic Trails Interpretive Center in Casper…

It is located on a bluff adjacent to the Overland Trails – the trails used by the emigrants to Oregon, the 49ers going to California, and the Mormons going to the Great Salt Lake valley…

Before we had left the campground this morning our leaders asked that the ladies wear their Oregon Trail bonnets and dresses… As you might guess, we are non-participants in activities such as this…

We walked toward the museum building…

The building itself reflects a lot of imagery…

The blue wall segments represent the continuous westward trek by the pioneers and the emigrants, always up hill. Missouri is at about 2,000′ elevation, and the continental Divide is at roughly 7,000′ where the trails crossed it…

The stone wall is all native sandstone, and the green wall represents the sagebrush that was the emigrants constant companion on the prairie.

The arch portal, of course, represents the hoops and canvas of the covered wagons…

Inside we watch a short film about the emigrants. The lifesize displays added to the realism of the film…

Some of the Mormon emigrants could not afford oxen or mules, so they carried their possessions for 1,500 miles using handcarts. Lynda gave it a try!

One of the more interesting tidbits of the radical changes the emigrants brought to this region is in addition to all the other self-inflicted damage that I have reported on – loss of food and habitat for Indians, Pony Express ended by the transcontinental telegraph, wagon trains ended by the railroad, small towns ended by the Interstate Highways…

As the 350,000 emigrants passed through here on the trails small settlements sprang up to service the needs of the emigrants. When the trains ended the wagon travel, the rails took a different route again, this time to be more convenient to the coal deposits of southern Wyoming. These settlements slowly vanished…

Outside the Museum is a reproduction of a typical Pony Express station. There is a small stable and a small office for the station master. The station master lived here alone; and he was alone – he was visited by only four Pony Express riders per week. Otherwise he was free to fend for himself. When the Pony Express ended, most of these stations were retrofitted to be relay stations for the telegraph… Adaptive Reuse!

We returned to the Villa. I took a nap… Then we had a modest Happy Hours. We walked around the RV park in the evening…

An enjoyable time was had by all

2021-07-31 – The Oregon Trail caravan … Day 3 – Hiawatha, MO and Grand Island, NE

We hitched up our wagons and the wagon train started west today, following the Oregon Trail… Or at least so it seems…

The Oregon Trail was a 2,170-mile east-west, large-wheeled wagon route and emigrant trail that connected the Missouri River to valleys in Oregon. The eastern part of the Oregon Trail spanned part of what is now the state of Kansas and nearly all of what are now the states of Nebraska and Wyoming. The western half of the trail spanned most of the current states of Idaho and Oregon.

The Oregon Trail was laid by fur traders and trappers from about 1811 to 1840 and was only passable on foot or by horseback. By 1836, when the first migrant wagon train was organized in Independence, Missouri, a wagon trail had been cleared to Fort Hall, Idaho. Wagon trails were cleared increasingly farther west, and eventually reached all the way to the Willamette Valley in Oregon. Annual improvements were made in the form of bridges, cutoffs, ferries, and roads, which made the trip faster and safer. From various starting points in Iowa, Missouri, or Nebraska Territory, the routes converged along the lower Platte River Valley near Fort Kearny, Nebraska Territory, and led to rich farmlands west of the Rocky Mountains.

From the early to mid-1830s (and particularly through the years 1846–1869) the Oregon Trail and its many offshoots were used by about 400,000 settlers, farmers, miners, ranchers, and business owners and their families. The eastern half of the trail was also used by travelers on the California Trail (from 1843), Mormon Trail (from 1847), and Bozeman Trail (from 1863), before turning off to their separate destinations. Use of the trail declined as the First Transcontinental Railroad was completed in 1869, making the trip west substantially faster, cheaper, and safer. Today, modern highways, such as Interstate 80 and Interstate 84, follow parts of the same course westward and pass through towns originally established to serve those using the Oregon Trail.

Early emigrants

On May 1, 1839, a group of eighteen men from Peoria, Illinois, set out with the intention of colonizing the Oregon country on behalf of the United States of America. The men of the Peoria Party were among the first pioneers to traverse most of the Oregon Trail. They carried a large flag emblazoned with their motto “Oregon Or The Grave“. Nine of these members eventually did reach Oregon.

In September 1840, Robert Newell, Joseph L. Meek, and their families reached Fort Walla Walla with three wagons that they had driven from Fort Hall. Their wagons were the first to reach the Columbia River over land, and they opened the final leg of Oregon Trail to wagon traffic.

In 1841, the Bartleson-Bidwell Party was the first emigrant group credited with using the Oregon Trail to emigrate west. The group set out for California, but about half the party left the original group at Soda Springs, Idaho, and proceeded to the Willamette Valley in Oregon, leaving their wagons at Fort Hall.

On May 16, 1842, the second organized wagon train set out from Elm Grove, Missouri, with more than 100 pioneers. The party was led by Elijah White. The group broke up after passing Fort Hall with most of the single men hurrying ahead and the families following later.

Great Migration of 1843

In what was dubbed “The Great Migration of 1843” or the “Wagon Train of 1843”, an estimated 700 to 1,000 emigrants left for Oregon.  They were led initially by John Gantt, a former U.S. Army Captain and fur trader who was contracted to guide the train to Fort Hall for $1 per person. The winter before, Marcus Whitman had made a brutal mid-winter trip from Oregon to St. Louis to appeal a decision by his mission backers to abandon several of the Oregon missions. He joined the wagon train at the Platte River for the return trip. When the pioneers were told at Fort Hall by agents from the Hudson’s Bay Company that they should abandon their wagons there and use pack animals the rest of the way, Whitman disagreed and volunteered to lead the wagons to Oregon. He believed the wagon trains were large enough that they could build whatever road improvements they needed to make the trip with their wagons. The biggest obstacle they faced was in the Blue Mountains of Oregon where they had to cut and clear a trail through heavy timber. The wagons were stopped at The Dalles, Oregon, by the lack of a road around Mount Hood. The wagons had to be disassembled and floated down the treacherous Columbia River and the animals herded over the rough Lolo trail to get by Mt. Hood. Nearly all of the settlers in the 1843 wagon trains arrived in the Willamette Valley by early October. A passable wagon trail now existed from the Missouri River to The Dalles.

So our wagon train set out for Oregon…

We headed back towards St. Joseph, and crossed over the wide Missouri into Kansas again…

About an hour later we arrived in Hiawatha and found the Brown County Agricultural Museum and Windmill Lane…

It is an interesting place. Many old barns have been moved onto the property, and thousands of ancient home appliances and farm tools and implements, from Tractors and Combines to open end wrenches, are on display.

As we all pulled in together. Parking was a little tight…

Very tight…

In fact, it was so tight that we pulled up close to one another. In the photo below you can see the Villa parked next to a telephone pole. But there will be plenty of room to pull around the pole once the other Airstreams left.

There are probably 50 windmills of all shapes and types. Most often windmills operated pumps bring water up from wells. Some of the windmills charged batteries providing power and lights, and some even generated electricity through a wind-powered generator…

The various bards are full of ancient appliances, tractors, plows, cars, and other miscellaneous things…

As some of the first Airstreams started to pull out it was time to leave. I checked out the space around the telephone pole, backed up a bit to get a little more clearance, and I started to pull forward.

There was plenty of room as my tires went by the pole. However, there was a large low spot adjacent to the pole. Thus, as I pulled forward, the Villa tilted towards the pole to the point that it was within 1/16 of an inch of touching the pole. There we stopped.

Much head-scratching later, we (about 20 Airstream experts) decided that the only way to get past the pole was to jack up the Airstream far enough to get long 2×6 boards under the wheels to un-tilt the Airstream. We found boards, blocks, and three small hydraulic jacks. After much huffing, puffing, and groaning we had the wheels off the ground and the boards and blocks fitted beneath the wheels…

I pulled forward and we were clear, to much applause. All that was left to do was to collect the boards, blocks, and jacks and return them to their rightful places…

And we were on the road again…

We turned north and finally reached Nebraska! We had not been in the Villa in Nebraska before. This is state #41!

Nebraska is, of course, full of corn fields…

About the only difference we could see between Kansas and Nebraska is that Nebraska has more irrigated fields…

We stopped at a Rest Area, where we were joined by another Airstream…

We arrived at our parking spot for two nights – this is Fonner Park, the home of the Nebraska State Fair, located in Grand Island… Lots of room, not too warm, and barely humid…

We celebrated the liberation of the Villa from the pole with Happy Hours; I shared many bottles of my wine with my new friends.

An enjoyable time was had by all…

2021-07-30 – The Oregon Trail caravan … Day 2 – St. Joseph and Maysville, MO

Today we visited a few attractions in St. Joseph. We began at Western Missouri State College, where they have the Walter Cronkite Memorial…

Walter Cronkite lived 1916 to 2009. He was a reporter during WW II and began leading the news on CBS TV in 1953 until his retirement in 1981. He was an eye witness to all major news stories in the second half of the 20th century.

The exhibit has photos, videos, and memorabilia. It was a very interesting place…

The have a reproduction of his TV news studio…

There was also an interesting but rather bizarre piece of art commemorating Apollo 11 and the space program in general…

The Kennedy assassination…

Famous news stories… Can you find Patty Hearst?

And that’s the way it was…

We then went to the well-visited Stetson Hat Outlet… No, I didn’t buy a cowboy hat. Never wore one, never will..

In downtown St. Joseph we visited the Patee House Hotel.

When John Patee opened his luxurious four-story brick hotel in 1858, he knew it was an innovation for its time, but little did he suspect that 134 years later it would still be attracting visitors from across the United States.

Patee built it as a hotel, a role that was not to be because of its location more than a mile from downtown St. Joseph. Yet it was a hotel three times, a girl’s college twice, and finally a shirt factory for more than 80 years.

I’m always fascinated by these old hotels, exactly because they so rarely last very long. The Patee House was built in 1858. It housed the headquarters of the Pony express in 1860. Then the Civil war came and the army moved in; we had the industrial evolution, and all the “modern” innovations rendered the building obsolete.

This was the grand ballroom, furnished as it was in 1860…

The Dining Room in one of the suites…

The Bridal Suite…

Another suite…

We saw typical bedrooms, bathrooms as renovated in the 1920s, and lots of other historic memorabilia. I would have loved to see more. But we had to gather for the obligatory group photo… Yes, the women are all wearing period-appropriate bonnets…

We toured the Pony Express Museum…

The Pony Express was a mail service delivering messages, newspapers, and mail using relays of horse-mounted riders that operated from April 3, 1860, to October 26, 1861, between Missouri and California.

The Pony Express was not a mail service of the USPS. It was owned and operated by the Central Overland California and Pikes Peak Express Company. It was of great financial importance to the U.S. During its 18 months of operation it reduced the time for messages to travel between the Atlantic and Pacific coasts to about 10 days.  It became the West’s most direct means of east-west communication before the transcontinental telegraph was established in October, 1861. It was vital for tying the new U.S. state of California with the rest of the United States.

The Pony Express was not a financial success and went bankrupt in 18 months, when faster telegraph service was established. Nevertheless, it demonstrated that a unified transcontinental system of communications could be established and operated year-round. When replaced by the telegraph, the Pony Express quickly became romanticized and became part of the lore of the American West. All of Buffalo Bill’s Wild West shows featured information on the Pony Express. Its reliance on the ability and endurance of individual young, hardy riders and fast horses was seen as evidence of rugged American individualism of the frontier times. As we are finding out on this caravan, every small town along the route today has a Pony Express Museum…

Many people don’t know that the Pony Express only ran for 18 months, and, in fact, it was doomed from the start. The construction of the transcontinental telegraph also began in 1860, The founders of the Pony Express must have known this… Very odd…

So our caravan begins here, at the eastern terminus of the Pony Express. The Oregon Trail follows the west-bound path of the Pony Express for the first few hundred miles…

Oregontrail 1907.jpg

Tomorrow we head west!

An enjoyable time was had by all…

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